Yssa FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

Female
from Austin, TX

  • Activity

    • See you later, space cowboy

      1 week ago

      Yssa

      Man, the last time I posted before answering the Extra Life question was the end of 2016??? That's nuts, someone remind me I gotta make more journals every so often.


      Hey, everyone! As you may have heard, Fan Service's biggest announcement is that we weren't getting renewed for another season. I wanted to take this time to reflect personally on this show, talk about some of the things I loved and will miss, and think about the future ahead! 


      There, that's my thesis statement, strap in, folks.


      To be honest, going in to Fan Service, I wouldn't have labeled myself as a ~*super*~ anime fan. All through college and a little after, I'd been watching more western cartoons. I've only really watched a new anime or two every year, though my enthusiasm for a series is enough to fill the void of other content I wasn't participating in. But in the end, that enthusiasm became my saving grace and main role in Fan Service. 


      We had to watch an anime every season. If we wanted to be on we had to talk specifically about an anime that we felt very strongly about. Every "what are you excited about for next season?" meant doing research about what was coming up and learning about the new trends of anime and being oddly excited about the future to come. It felt like a slow and insidious process. The first season I was just watching, what, two shows? Three? Then the next season, I had four on my queue. Then it went on in that pattern until, one day, I realized I was actively going through Crunchyroll and putting things in my queue to just try out. Now I'm watching anime YouTubers dissect serious and studios and taking into account their recommendations. 


      Who KNEW! ThaT! If you were involved in an anime show, you'd WATCH MORE ANIME?!?!?!?  /sarcasm


      (By the way, I actually a good chunk of what Cole recommends. He has good taste and can discern what show you'd like!)


      If there's something I like to be, it's informed. Fan Service helped me be up to date (on my better days haha) and be more aware of what goes on in the anime community. It also meant knowing who does what and what goes on behind the scenes in our industry. I'm so happy that our anime podcast facilitated discussion and enabled us to bring new people to our glass table and call them our friends after the episode was done. Elizabeth Maxwell, Reina Sculley, Victoria Holden, Jessica Nigri, Caitlin Glass, Cliff Chapin, Monica Rial, and Sungwon Cho were all soooooo nice and great to have, and their insights into voice acting, dubbing, and the culture and community in general were so informative! I felt so happy and honored that they'd take their time out of their lives to just chill and hang with us, and I'm going to miss that so much.


      Speaking of taking time out of their lives, HOLY COW there were a lot of other people who spent time with us too right inside our company! ROLL CALL! Michael Jones, Lindsay Jones, Shannon McCormick (putting you here because you're a family member at this point, Shannon, haha), Mica Burton, Elyse Willems, Blaine Gibson, Barbara Dunkelman, Tim Gettys, Nick Scarpino, James Willems, Kdin Jenzen, and Lawrence Sonntag! /anime theme song meme

      These guys are HECKIN BUSY. It was so fun to just be around them and hear their own personal insights and favorites about anime, and I know we work in the same company but I already miss them :'))

      This particular interaction sums up my overall feelings about having these guys on--Tim and Nick from Kinda Funny had told us they were a little intimidated about being on the show because they felt like we were experts. Consequently, I feel like they schooled us a little by mentioning an anime I never heard about before, and their passion for the shows they loved was just as justified as ours. At the end of it, we had a great time being together and talking with each other about anime, and that's all that matters.


      Of course, where would we be without our own Animation guests. Stan Lewis, Kim Newman, Andrea Caprotti, Tony Salvaggio, Tanya Fetzer, Patrick Rodriguez, Dustin Matthews, and Rachel Doda, they work hard and know how to have fun. Some of the most interesting viewpoints and lessons came from these guys who I see almost every day! It's wonderful to know I inhabit a space with amazing people, all with different experiences and different viewpoints for me to learn from. 


      Also special paragraph for Erin Winn for being our thumbnail artist, a great friend, and being around for the final few episodes of Fan Service. I love seeing your face (smoochy face)


      (I sincerely hope I didn't miss a guest let me know if I did SWEATS)


      If it were anyone else in the cast, I would've been worried going into it as the only girl. It's hard being a minority HAHA. But with Cole, Kerry, Miles, Gray, and Austin backing me up, it felt seamless. I'm honored that I developed a working relationship with these guys to be included as main cast, and I've gleaned so much from every one of them. They all work hard at their jobs, and Fan Service was one of the few times I got to spend time with them outside of our work space. Adding Erin in was great too! I was finally not the only girl!!! Even though technically we were "still working", it was always the most fun two hours of my week to be with them while Broadcast works to make the magic happen. 


      Big ups to the Broadcast team as well! Hearing and participating in conversations on how the show should go was always a learning experience, and I always get to see firsthand the labor that goes with making a show. Broadcast is the best.


      I'm at a point where I'm just screaming now because AHH!! The community! You guys are so awesome! Thank you so much for watching our dinky anime show. Your outpour of support for it after our announcement makes me smile, and I'm glad that people were watching. One of my favorite memories was how packed RTX 2017 was for our panel. It was a huuuuge room, and almost every seat was filled. Then, every time one of us came out, there was always a huge cheer before we inevitably went behind the curtain. 


      One of my biggest insecurities is that I'm always Too Much. I'm Too Loud, Too Emotional, Too Taxing, Too Annoying. And it's something that I don't know how to turn off, and I lie awake at night groaning about how dumb I am. But at least, I dunno, this Fan Service collective let me be that person and was completely ok with it. I guess what I'm saying is--thanks, guys, for being ok with me HAHAHAHA.


      Although Fan Service is out for the count, anime isn't! I highly encourage everyone to keep an eye on Gray, Austin, Kerry, Miles, Cole, and my accounts on the RT site, Twitter, where ever, because we might end up talking about some new anime thing that is relevant to our interests. I am definitely screaming about an anime at some point or another on twitter. 


      When I think about Fan Service, I get sad because I wish I could have spent more time with everyone in our recordings. I know I wanted to do more, wanted to understand more, and try to be a better version of myself with every new season. But I will always feel grateful that we were able to come this far together. Thank you, everyone, for making this all possible. I'm honored to have been part of your RT life for the past two years.


    • d3xfox asked Yssa a question

      Hey Yssa i just rewatched the camp camp 1st season Q&A stream and remembered about them mentioning your fanfiction about the campers being in highschool is it dropped or is it out there already?

      Answered: Dec 2, 2017

      IT'S NO WHERE I'M NOT GONNA PUBLISH IT EVER


      (Jordan ended up reading a part of it on the Extra Life Stream the last two hours, and I was sooo embarrassed.)

    • Final 2016 Send-Off

      1 year ago

      Yssa

      I jokingly said my 2016 resolution was "don't let your memes be dreams", and to be frank, I ended up accomplishing a lot of small victories and goals this year. Not like I can type it all out in one go, I'm not going to put in the effort to haha, but this year was a grand year of change. 


      One of my favorite things about this year was the production of Camp Camp. With every show there are ups and downs, but working on Camp Camp with Jordan, Maggie, and the rest of our small but mighty 2D team was such a blessing. The team has helped me learn new things about being a lead and new things about myself, and I am incredibly thankful for the opportunity to be a part of their lives. Love u fam. Pussies for life. 


      On top of that, I'm grateful for the opportunity to be noticed by you guys! Thank you so much for your support through this time. This year came with its own downsides, but the overwhelming love for Camp Camp, Fan Service, and just about ANYTHING has been a great upside. You guys are the bestest. 


      2017 is pretty murky territory. I'm going in blind, but my goal for next year is to really figure out what I want to do and set my own secret goals to accomplish. It'll be a rough ride, but time moves on and so shall I. 


      Happy new year!

    • How did we get to Yuri!!! on Ice?

      1 year ago

      Yssa

      Hello, guys, gals, and nonbinary pals! I hope you're enjoying your weekly dose of Fan Service. The past few weeks of prep, talking, and screaming about anime with Kerry, Miles, Gray, Cole, Austin, and everyone who's stopped by has been a huge blast. I'd hate for you guys to miss out on any episodes, so please consider being a FIRST member! It's pretty darn good price per month, and the best part is you get the first 30-days free as a trial. When I was just a fan, before I worked at Rooster Teeth, I kept my ~*premium status*~ because I thought the content Rooster Teeth had was pretty much worth it.


      In lieu of our choices for Anime Club, there was a common thread of thought in our conversations about Yuri!!! On Ice:

      How did Yuri!!! On Ice come to be? How did the landscape of anime trends all lead up to an ice skating anime featuring a prominent male cast? I've written down my questions, done some research, and decided I wanted to share with you guys my findings and my thoughts. I'll even cite my sources! It's like a real college essay!!!!!! Wait. Where are you going. Come back.


      To accurately figure out how Yuri!!! On Ice (which I'll abbreviate to YOI) was conceived, we have to look at the big picture. There's been significant rise of sports anime and manga in the past decade, so let's delve into an exact history of how sports anime made its way into mainstream.


      The first recorded sports manga was Captain Tsubasa by Yoichi Takahashi in 1981 in the Weekly Shounen Jump magazine. The soccer manga (football to non-Americans) about a Japanese youth soccer team and its captain, Tsubasa Oozora, rose to popularity to get its own anime in 1983. It gained worldwide momentum as European, Southeast Asian, and South American countries dubbed and aired it, in turn inspiring a generation to start playing soccer.


      Since then, a lot of different sports anime and manga have come and gone with varying degrees of success. Its wide range of material meant you could have sports manga about basketball (Slam Dunk), boxing (Hajime no Ippo), and even strategy board games like Go (Hikaru no Go). The genre became a solid staple of the anime industry--although it didn’t attract as much attention in the western world as a Uniquely Anime Thing in comparison to Mecha or Action. How, then, did it suddenly boom in the last decade?


      User GuardianEnzo on myanimelist.org cites two series.

      One is Prince of Tennis by Takeshi Konomi, a tennis sports manga published in Weekly Shounen Jump in 1999 with an anime airing in 2001. The story follows a middle school tennis prodigy, Ryoma Echizen, who joins the Seishun Academy's tennis team and his journey to be the best tennis player in all of Japan, all while making new friends and mastering new techniques. Its popularity is still present by the number of spin-offs and movies it’s produced since its inception, and has even tried to make its way overseas by being the first sports anime to air on the Toonami block in 2006.

      The second series is The Big Windup! by Asa Higuchi. The baseball manga was published in seinen magazine “Afternoon”, with an anime that aired in 2007. In 2006, it won the New Hope Award in the Tezuka Cultural Award for "showing new possibilities of expression in baseball manga" and subsequently won the Kodansha Manga Award for General Manga in 2007. It became the first sports anime to be a 5-digit best seller of disc media, and sports series after its successful reception can trace its thematic roots back to it.


      But then what do all of the following "mainstream" titles--Prince of Tennis, Kuroko no Basuke, Haikyuu!!, Yowamushi Pedal, The Big Windup!--all have in common?


      A: They're all directed towards a male demographic.

      B: A large part of their audience is made up of women.

      C: You probably know about them because of the internet.


      We can potentially derail by talking about how women and the internet intersect and end up informing trends, or we can take another route and talk about how doujinshi, or fan-comics, made by women also tie to the success of an existing series, BUT LET'S STAY ON TRACK HERE.


      I personally believe that the popularity of the previous titles have to deal with the quality of its content. While focusing on the aspect of technique and terminology in the specific sport they're about, these popular titles also hone in on the Team aspect of each sport. Each character generates camaraderie and significant interpersonal relationships that enable them to grow as individuals and with each other while following the passion of their youth. Yes, characters follow tropes. But each series takes the time to explore the characters' mindsets of why they are the way they are, and how they are in relation to others. These sports series transcend its central sport focus. It becomes a series about a team, a group of people who come together through thick and thin.

      Of course, every fan is different. But generally speaking, the interpersonal relationships gives an avenue for an audience who likes shipping, or taking characters and pairing them romantically, a solid foundation.


      So, let's park it for a bit. Anime and manga don't just have series designations for boys (shounen) and for men (seinen), but they have categories for girls (shoujo) and for women (josei). And there are definitely sports series that exist for the female demographic. For example, Princess Nine was a 1998 anime about a female high school baseball team. Crimson Hero is a shoujo volleyball manga published in 2003 and was part of Viz Media's monthly "Shojo Beat". Why don't women latch on to these titles and ship these characters, instead of superimposing romance between male teammates? There's a whole genre for homosexual love--Boy Love, or BL--that is also FOR women. There's even discourse about why homosexual characters are geared toward women!! What gives?!


      The prevailing thought is that media aimed for women is still considered "niche." It's not that these series or genre don't have an audience; it's that shoujo and josei titles never cross over into mainstream consciousness.


      Take, as a more well-known example, romance movies or romantic comedies. A common story is that a man won't see a rom-com unless a woman takes him. Same thing works for shoujo/josei. Unless you're knee deep into anime and want to try something different, a casual viewer might not be inclined to pick up something with a central focus on romance and drama.


      Also, frankly, a lot of shoujo/josei/BL titles aren't always treated with the same care as other general titles are. Story tropes and character stereotypes are genre conceits, with romance being a driving force of most plots. Most plots become a “will they or won’t they” scenario. Additionally, when these series are translated into animation, the quality isn't always top-notch. They end up being primary examples of economic and awkward animation in an industry that has to churn out an episode each week. It's natural that more people will gravitate towards series that are labeled for a general (male-coded) audience and have more production value. When you have a pool of choices to watch, why go for a “7 out of 10” when you can go for a “9 out of 10”?


      There are exceptions. A shoujo title I'd argue that did the big leap into mainstream is Ouran High School Host Club by Bisco Hatori. Primarily a story about a scholarship female student who must crossdress and be part of the all-male host club in her prestigious high school, the series was a genuine delight for using genre mainstays of shoujo while simultaneously poking fun at them. Each character had a reason for being, relied on each other for support, and Studio Bones did a great job spinning the original art style into something fun, bright, and funny. More often than not, I came across fans of the show that didn't care about its perceived demographic.


      The kicker is that everyone, no matter what they identify as, wants something good. They like a good story, they like good characters, and they like to be visually entertained. If you're not following up on either, then you're gonna have an audience shortage.


      But HoOw does this relate to sports anime?! Where is the lead up to YOI??


      Take all of these previous points, build them up over years of trends and a growing international anime audience, and you get--


      Free! Iwatobi Swim Club.


      Free! was the perfect birth child of the internet, where in 2012 Animation Do released a splash image and commercial for a project in March 2013. It garnered attention for its shirtless male characters looking at the camera while they have fun times by the swimming pool, fun bright visual style, and for its animation quality. The commercial went viral, especially on Tumblr, and they dubbed the unnamed project the "swimming anime." This all came to a peak when Kyoto Animation & Animation Do released the official anime in 2013, and it became an international and marketing hit, spawning two seasons and a movie.


      Free! gained attention primarily because Kyoto Animation was a well-established studio with a reputation for high quality animation sequences. More often than not, their shows skewed towards a male demographic. Interesting, cute female characters, like Haruhi Suzumiya and the entire cast ofK-On, were often the focal point, while male characters could best be described as "beige paint chips". Free! was the first time they ventured into appealing to a different audience with a centered male cast. While the reception of the swimming show was met with backlash from a male community (spawning blogs such as mantearsflowingfree.tumblr.com, an archive dedicated to showcasing instances of men complaining about Free!), its monetary value has never been overlooked and remains one of the more known sports anime.


      The success of Free! has, in turn, informed the industry of an audience that demands for quality and care. While not the first swimming anime series in history (Kenkou Zenrakei Suieibu Umishou takes the trophy for first), it is the most visually arresting and consequently issued a challenge to the rest of sports anime. How do you put a refreshing twist to an existing genre? What can you do to push the animation medium to something beautiful and appealing? (How much gay subtext could you possibly put in a show?)


      And so we come to Yuri!!! On Ice. While also not the first figure skating anime, Studio MAPPA has taken great care in trying to animate the beauty of figure skating by consulting award-winning figure skater Kenji Miyamoto and using a mix of rotoscoping, 3D, and 2D animation to blend it all together. Its visual style and beauty advertised in initial promotional videos were enough to garner attention from those affected by the Free! wave, and it should be noted that its primary writers and directors are both women who've been in the field for years--Mitsurou Kubo, writer and artist of 3.3.7 Byooshi and Moteki, and Sayo Yamamoto, director of critically acclaimed Michiko & Hatchin and Lupin III: The Woman Called Fujiko Mine. Kubo’s biggest series feature men with a passion in ouendan, the Japanese equivalent to cheerleading. Yamamoto’s strengths as a director lies in her experiments with color, pop art, and using different visual effects to enhance the feeling of the animation. With her characters, she takes the opportunity to tell stories through different lenses, such as making Fujiko Mine the main character for Lupin III: The Woman Called Fujiko Mine, and setting Michiko & Hatchin in Brazil with a predominantly non-Japanese/non-white cast of characters. She claims comedy and erotica come easy to her, which is something we should expect from YOI.


      Yuri!!! on Ice's conception is, ultimately, a grand journey of women in the industry; how women influence the industry trends, and how women creators are rising to prominence.


      Often labeled without a precise demographic like other published series, YOI is a show that's already challenging that perception. You can oftentimes tell what an anime's perceived demographic is by visuals alone. Is it for women? Or do the adult-looking not-as-big-eyed designs of YOI mean its for a more mature, general audience? Should the series be labeled as Boy Love, when that wasn’t a label tacked on to it in the first place? As the season goes on, we'll be able to pick up on tells, hints, and themes about who YOI is really for--and maybe why it doesn't even matter.

    • My Top 5 Introductory Anime

      1 year ago

      Yssa

      Hello!!! Fan Service #03 had us talking about what our Top Introductory Anime would be for first-time viewers. The cast have their own unique approaches to choose their top 5, so here's mine with a countdown starting aaaaaaaaaat--


      5. Summer Wars
      This is the one I wanted to highlight during the episode, large in part because this is my favorite anime movie ever. It's about a high school boy who's roped into a summer vacation with his crush, and he finds himself in the epicenter of a global breakdown when the internet, and subsequently the world, is literally stopped by a computer virus--all while experiencing family drama his crush is a part of. 
      Summer Wars has a lot of everything in two hours; action, drama, family, a little bit of sci-fi--it's like it's got everything for everyone!! I highly encourage everyone to give it a shot because I feel like if I just talk about it more, I'll just spoil the movie lol.


      4. Samurai Champloo
      Take feudal Japan and mix it with hip-hop, and you get Samurai Champloo!! The presentation of taking two drastically different things to put them together to prove how they're actually quite complimentary is something director Shinichiro Watanabe specializes in. 
      We definitely talked about this one in the episode and we're gonna do a deep-dive in to the next as well, so I feel like I should keep my thing short because, at this point, everyone knows we think Samurai Champloo is pretty great. ᕕ( ᐛ )ᕗ


      3. Haikyuu!!
      It's no secret I love Haikyuu!!, but hear me out. I know someone who saw the first episode of Haikyuu!! (because of his wife haha) and latched on to it really quickly. He doesn't actively go looking for anime, but he loved the feeling and the portrayal of the characters and the team dynamic because it reminded him of his own high school days.
      SO, LIKE, I HAVE A VALID REASON! WITH EVIDENCE!
      Haikyuu!! initially follows Shouyou Hinata, a boy who loves volleyball despite his short stature, who's faced with an interesting challenge--he has to be on a team with the person he promised to defeat. The show evolves into portraying the development between Hinata and his team as they move on to try and win at a national level. 
      The show has a great way of keeping a balance between humor and serious character revelations, and stays grounded on a realm of "realistic possibility". Like, if you want something that's less fantastical and maybe more real-world-y, then you're on to something with Haikyuu!! If you ever think about trying a gateway into sports anime, since the genre is becoming more prevalent in the past few years (which I will talk about later ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)), Haikyuu!! is the one I'd recommend!


      2. Ouran High School Host Club
      A lot of our list is skewed toward a general/male demographic in mind, so I wanted to give a spot to a series that's for a female demographic but challenges gender portrayal in the first place--and that's Ouran High School Host Club.
      Haruhi Fujioka is a poor scholarschip student in an obnoxiously rich high school who's forced into working with the school's Host Club--essentially, a club for women to experience the attention of handsome men. The twist, of course, is that she's actually a girl playing as a man. 
      The first episode does a great set-up to this genderbender, and one of the main focuses of the show is about looking past gender in the first place. Haruhi herself advocates that gender doesn't matter, and the show does a fantastic job of proving its own thesis: although things look shallow, if you explore the deep end, you'll find much more than you'd expect!


      1. Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood
      I genuinely love FMA:B, and I think it's possibly one of the best series ever to exist.
      Although FMA:B is a bit of a long haul with commitment, everything about it is so intensely rewarding. I mention in the show that my sister, who doesn't often participate in watching anime, loves FMA:B, and that's enough for me to highly recommend this show to people who haven't watched anime before. (Fun fact: my older brother also likes FMA:B!)
      FMA:B, to me, is like the quintessential anime to show to people. It deals with harder subjects like religion, race, prejudice, and the value of life, and shows great care to every character it introduces. It doesn't take place in the "real world", but there are enough similarities and parallels to existing places and cultures that it's easy to follow along if you have basic knowledge of it. Most importantly, the story is gripping. Nothing is wasted, and every reward is earned. 



      I realize, after looking at my list, that I like to recommend shows that got me to think. I love shows that prompt conversation, and these are the ones that I end up talking about a lot! Hopefully these are interesting enough titles and reasons for you to start watching. 


      Thanks, as always, for watching Fan Service!! Hope to catch you next time 8)

    • It's my One-Year Anniversary at RoosterTeeth!

      1 year ago

      Yssa

      I was yelling about it earlier today, and Cesar was like, "What the FUCK" and I was like "YEAH you've hated me for one whole year!" and we laughed because we're friends. I think.


      I'm not sure if I really told my story of how I got here. It's not really full of strife or ~*hard times*~ or shit like that--believe me, I'm privileged enough to know I got here because I had nothing to lose--but I think now is a good time to really open up about it!


      Working at Rooster Teeth was my five-year plan when I was starting in LA. Get a job. Git gud. Start working on 3D animation on the side (because RWBY). If anything, I was happy with a plan. I was at the tail-end of my first job in the industry, I had a bunch of knowledge and more experience, and I was freaking out about what to do after the project ended. Being able to think about resetting and planning future goals was really relaxing (??) for me.

      Then, I saw randomly on the jobs listing here that they were looking for a 2D ToonBoom/Flash animator.


      My friend from work, Adam (@rickabus!), and my sister were the two major people in pushing me to just apply. Mostly Adam going, "DO IT YOU'RE GONNA GET IN" and my sister going, "you're young just try that's how you got your job."


      A few weeks later, I'm sweatin' because my five-year-plan turned into a three-week plan and I have to figure out housing and moving things and taking care of loose ends. I had enough saved up to support myself for a while. Things will go fine. Sure. Ok.


      My parents thought I was making a GIANT MISTAKE. Granted, I told them a whole week before I moved, and they were worried about my transition. "Are you getting a promotion? Why would you move????" I couldn't answer those questions confidently to them because it just looked like I was doing something wrong in their eyes, no matter how much I wanted to tell them I wanted this for a while.


      Ten months after that, I was talking to my mom on the phone, and she mentioned how my dad was really shocked that a whole year passed where I had to renew my apartment lease again. I laughed and told her,

      "See! The risk was worth it! I'm full-time! You don't have to worry about me looking for a new studio to work in for a while!"

      And she said, "Ahh, yeah, yeah. You were right. Pa and I don't have to worry about you too much because you sound happy where you are."


      Then afterward I had to tell her that yeah I'll pay her back for the cellphone bill and my student loan yeah yeah I love you too ma no I can't visit right now, etc.


      I always thought RoosterTeeth was a place that fostered creativity, and working here hasn't changed my opinion! From the day I started, every day has been filled with new challenges to think through and more opportunities to laugh and learn new things about people. I'm not the best, but I'm so grateful that I have people around me to guide me whenever I make mistakes and listen to me whenever I need to talk. I'm especially grateful for the friends I've made, the people that actually put up with me haha, and the giant influx of knowledge I have now that I didn't know a year ago. I looooove RTAnimation, and the 2D team has been such a great group of people who are just as passionate as I am about creating and working on the shows we work on now. Everyone in RT is dedicated to making a genuine, quality product, and that motivation helps motivate me to do my best at work and love what I do!!


      Thank you to everyone who's noticed and supported me since the day I started being active in the community huehue. Thank you, RT, for taking a chance on me and letting me be a part of your history. I hope I have many more anniversaries to come \o/

    • Camp Camp! TEAM TEAM!

      1 year ago

      Yssa

      DID YOU SEE THE CAMP CAMP TEASER YET???? BECAUSE YOU SHOULD!!!


      Camp Camp is something that I've been excited about since we started working on it. I'm very happy and lucky that I get to be lead on an amazing show that I believe in, that has really awesome art and characters, and more importantly has a really GREAT FUCKING RAD team backing it!


      Keep an eye out for more Camp Camp! Maybe I'll actually put up a journal that's more personal and not just plugging! BUT GOD THIS IS PERSONAL BECAUSE I LOVE CAMP CAMP!!!!!

    • AbhijitM asked Yssa a question

      Hey Yssa, I noticed on Twitter that you started watching Kuroko's basketball... What did you think of it? Will you talk about it on the next RT Anime podcast?

      Answered: Feb 19, 2016

      Hello!! I watched the first (and second??) episode and have read up to a certain point of the beginning in the manga, but that's all my experience with it. I haven't gotten too far with it because the color saturation of regular anime is really jarring compared to the more natural-looking colors of Haikyuu!!

      As for if I'm on the next RTAnime podcast or not, stay tuned. I'm sure if it isn't me, the other guests will be just as exciting!

    • Just_Cillian asked Yssa a question

      Being an introvert, what was going through your mind as you were about to come on camera, as you were talking and afterwards?

      Answered: Feb 9, 2016

      I was mostly really excited and nervous to get on, at first! It's like something in the pit of my stomach fizzling...probably the adrenaline. Most of the time I come on with some kind of mental plan as to what I want to say and how I'd want to say it, but the end result always ends up coming out kind of like word vomit and making a mess all over the place. If I want to be able to speak confidently, I have to rehearse all my points beforehand or be in an environment that makes me completely comfortable to do a rant/train-of-thought!

      RT is mostly improv, on the other hand, so afterwards, I just felt a dread of oh god I don't think I did that right hahahahahaa Despite how people said I did a good job, I still wish I did my best job. After ruminating, especially after a "serious" discussion, I always end up re-playing the scene over and over again, thinking, "oh man, I should've said this or that." It's a guaranteed spiral downward into over-analyzing ):


      But then I get a bit better afterwards because you only get one shot at these things, so I have to live with whatever I may have said or acted. I'm actually used to the idea of "performing" in front of people, such as taking on a role or acting funny with friends or being on a dance team, so being on camera is like a higher exponent of that feeling. There's just a bit more scrutiny, so if I didn't like something, then I tell myself I'll do better next time!!

    • Post-RT Anime Thoughts

      1 year ago

      Yssa

      I've made an appearance on the RT Anime Podcast!

      I had the honor to sit with Gray, Kerry, and Miles to talk about the things I've been watching. Seeing as I'm actually an introvert and I'm actually a lot more confident with the written word instead of verbal, I'm here for some more post-mortem thoughts!


      But honestly I just really want to go more in-depth about Haikyuu!!


      My main takeaway from Haikyuu!! is more fandom interaction (fanart, fanfiction, etc.), which is why I can always talk about my ships and how boys love each other, blahblahblah. But!! In the heat of the moment, I end up blanking out on some of the most important things about Haikyuu!! that should be talked about!


      What ever ship you ship in some sports anime is cool, but I would hate to grossly misrepresent a fandom that can more accurately explain why Haikyuu!! should be watched and loved.


      For one, the animation and art is actually really appealing! Most sports anime I've seen tends to look a certain way, but for Haikyuu!!, you can tell the animators took reference from actual volleyball players to achieve really nice animation. Not to mention the art style is actually pretty different from some of the traditional anime stuff. Not saying that it's not anime style, but it's a different take! There aren't obnoxious skin highlights or anything. If I could describe the aesthetic of Haikyuu, it's probably something like....pleasant! It fits the energy of the show very well, which you'd understand if you...watch it ;)))))


      One of the best parts about Haikyuu!! is how the character development is real and substantial. You like each character, and you grow with each character, and you understand how and why a character grows into a new person and their motivations. It's actually compelling storytelling, despite its plot being very singular, "We're gonna play volleyball as much as we can." If you value character, Haikyuu!! is great for delivering that!


      Not to mention you genuinely like every character you're introduced to.


      Haikyuu!! is great for those feel-good times. If you're having the shittiest day, you should probably watch Haikyuu, because you will feel energized and ready to take on the day as you spiral into volleyball hell!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



      In other news, Gray also dropped that I am now a Lead Animator in the 2D team! (: So far, the team has been kicking ass, and I'm really excited to learn and grow with the department. Please look out for us and support us in our endeavors!


      There's a Questions tab too up there if you feel the burning need to ask me anything.

  • About Me

    2D Lead Animator at RoosterTeeth & all about female characters, pop culture, and lying in bed feeling useless.

    twitter: dearbassy
    tumblr: dearbassy
    instagram: dearbassy

  • Comments (10)

    • TheFenixPhire FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold Eternal Lurker

      5 months ago

      HAPPY BIRTHDAY YSSA! You're my favorite on fan service! 


      Sorry I didn't get to post this yesterday, I got called away for work and only just now got back to my computer.

      Keep being best girl!

    • planl FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      1 year ago

      Hi, Yssa! I'm loving your input on the Fan Service podcast. Your enthusiasm is infectious, and I can't tell you how much I appreciate you and Andrea being the resident experts for queer content in anime. I'm wondering if you guys also look at any news about Girls' Love content for the news segments. There's not much news to be found for that genre usually, but just within the last couple weeks there was a news bomb that 2 yuri manga are getting an anime adaptation, including the hugely popular (by yuri standards) "Citrus", but that news seems to be getting almost no attention outside of yuri circles. I didn't even hear about it until yesterday. I love BL a lot, but I wish GL got even half as much attention. Your great Sports Anime essay almost makes me want to write a research paper about the cultural and artistic differences between the two genres. Almost. <3

    • cyd0nia FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold Cosmic Floof

      1 year ago

      Hello! Thank you for accepting my friend request! :D

    • DavidtheWavid FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      1 year ago

      I shouldn't be surprised that anyone on the CRWBY is a Final Fantasy nerd, but just wanted to say that FF7 piano video you linked was awesome, and FF nerds unite.Think I've heard that recording but not the video.

    • Cinomari FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold Keeper of N00bs

      2 years ago

      Oh my god you're the cutest nerd in the history of ever how have I not seen you before.

    • DJwasHERE66 FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold Chieveable

      3 years ago

      Not to toot my own horn, but I knew you were cool before all these people! Haha, CONGRATS ON BEING FEATURED! :D

      • DJwasHERE66 FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold Chieveable

        3 years ago

        Haha, now you are 2 Legit 2 Quit

      • Yssa FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

        3 years ago

        LMAO ya damn hipster /shakes fist o9
        Nah but seriously thanks! Nice to know someone had my back since the beginning (:!!

    • Clutch84 FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      3 years ago

      Don't know if you have seen the newest episode of RWBY, but your fanart was featured at the end of the credits. Nice work, btw.

      • Yssa FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

        3 years ago

        Yes!! I caved and bought the sponsorship, so I was able to see it. Thank you!!

  • Questions answered by Yssa

    IT'S NO WHERE I'M NOT GONNA PUBLISH IT EVER


    (Jordan ended up reading a part of it on the Extra Life Stream the last two hours, and I was sooo embarrassed.)

    Hello!! I watched the first (and second??) episode and have read up to a certain point of the beginning in the manga, but that's all my experience with it. I haven't gotten too far with it because the color saturation of regular anime is really jarring compared to the more natural-looking colors of Haikyuu!!

    As for if I'm on the next RTAnime podcast or not, stay tuned. I'm sure if it isn't me, the other guests will be just as exciting!

    I was mostly really excited and nervous to get on, at first! It's like something in the pit of my stomach fizzling...probably the adrenaline. Most of the time I come on with some kind of mental plan as to what I want to say and how I'd want to say it, but the end result always ends up coming out kind of like word vomit and making a mess all over the place. If I want to be able to speak confidently, I have to rehearse all my points beforehand or be in an environment that makes me completely comfortable to do a rant/train-of-thought!

    RT is mostly improv, on the other hand, so afterwards, I just felt a dread of oh god I don't think I did that right hahahahahaa Despite how people said I did a good job, I still wish I did my best job. After ruminating, especially after a "serious" discussion, I always end up re-playing the scene over and over again, thinking, "oh man, I should've said this or that." It's a guaranteed spiral downward into over-analyzing ):


    But then I get a bit better afterwards because you only get one shot at these things, so I have to live with whatever I may have said or acted. I'm actually used to the idea of "performing" in front of people, such as taking on a role or acting funny with friends or being on a dance team, so being on camera is like a higher exponent of that feeling. There's just a bit more scrutiny, so if I didn't like something, then I tell myself I'll do better next time!!

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